Irish telecoms company uses LE-300 for off-grid power

"The LE 300 has proven it can do the job for me. I now know I can put a broadband access point pretty much anywhere without mains power. "

Terry Leyden, Managing Director

Company: Kilronan Communications

Based in Western Ireland, Kilronan Communications (Kilcom) brings fast broadband to areas that are often forgotten about because of their remoteness and low levels of population. Powering remote broadband access points is a headache, that was until Kilcom discovered the LE-300 wind turbine.

Utilizing the worldwide license-free 24GHz band, Kilcom uses airFiber to deliver fibre powered broadband to homes and businesses wirelessly – without the need to have fibre installed locally.

With a range of 13km, airFiber requires repeaters distributed across the countryside, many of these are in locations where there is no power supply.

While solar PV panels can help to provide some of the off-grid power needed, the low solar irradiance levels during the winter mean that power generated by solar PV panels is often not enough.  In Western Ireland, daylight hours are just 8.74 hours  at the winter equinox on 21 December compared to 16.5 hours on 21 June at the peak.

“One of the remote broadband access points which I used to power using a 150 watt PV, only supplied around 50% of what is required for a few weeks around 21st December so this year I decided to invest in wind power with the LE-300,” said Terry Leyden, Managing Director of Kilronan Communications.

“The first time the batteries went flat in December I disconnected the PV and ran it on wind only.  The LE-300 survived all the Winter storms and today, 22nd April, is first the first time I have seen the battery voltage even dip but it has been very calm.”

Hybrid power systems, utilising the strengths of both wind energy and solar PV, ensure that the power system is online, regardless of the weather!

“The LE 300 has proven it can do the job for me. I now know I can put a broadband access point pretty much anywhere without mains power,” concluded Terry Leyden.